100% American

100% American The article “100% American” by Ralph Linton says a lot of how the foundation of the American culture was formed. The article hints as America being a melting pot, but in reality it really is not such. Some of the countries mentioned are not immigrants of America so the culture was not brought over. America rather is the modernized version of ancient culture. They take a “bed built on a pattern which originated in the Near East but which was modified in Northern Europe.” While using an item from the Near East and having it modified to be more progressive and up to date to get the full use out of it.

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10 Famous People

10 Famous People Gandhi
Upon completing his degree in Law, Gandhi returned to India, where he was soon sent to South Africa to practice law. In South Africa, Gandhi was struck by the level of racial discrimination and injustice often experienced by Indians. It was in South Africa that Gandhi first experimented with campaigns of civil disobedience and protest; he called his non- violent protests -satyagraha. Despite being imprisoned for short periods of time he also supported the British under certain conditions. He was decorated by the British for his efforts during the Boer war and Zulu rebellion.

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10 Comanments

10 ComanmentsChapter 16
Section 1
1(terms and names): Joseph Stalin: Leader of the USSR (Russia)
Benito Mussolini: fascist dictator of Italy, best known for association with the Nazi party.
Totalitarian: a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator
Fascism: An authoritarian and nationalistic right-wing system of government and social organization.
Hitler: Leader of the Nazi party, prime minister/dictator of Germany during WW2
Nazism: a form of socialism featuring racism and expansionism and obedience to a strong leader
Francisco Franco: A Spanish military leader and statesman, who ruled as the dictator of Spain from 1936 until his death, came to power during the Spanish civil war.

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10 Ap World Review Sheet-Midterm

10 Ap World Review Sheet-MidtermArchaeology: The study of human history and prehistory through the excavation of sites and the analysis of artifacts.
Neolithic Revolution: The Neolithic Revolution is the first agricultural revolution--the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture and settlement.
River Valley Civilizations: the first complex, politically centralized civilizations began to crystallize independently along a number of river valleys.

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Amendments Essay

Amendments EssayAmendment 1
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or reduce the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

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World History

World History Settlers in early China, Nubia, Mesoamerica, and Central America had to be patient when it came to building a withstanding civilization due to the challenges to their ever- changing environments. Overwhelming hot and cold temperatures, rugged soil, and natural barriers withheld the people from developing a sustainable agricultural system, and therefore caused them to seek other survival methods.

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What Were These Differences and What Were the Major Causes for This to Be so?

What Were These Differences and What Were the Major Causes for This to Be so? 1. The civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt differ in profound ways. What were these differences and what were the major causes for this to be so?
There are many things that differ ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. Some of these differences are their religion, agriculture, writing skills, and inventions as well as their ways of life. The major cause of the differences they had was the location of the area where they lived in. The area affected their lifestyles in different ways.

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Nazi Anti-Semitism Shares Several Elements with Earlier Forms of Anti-Semitism

Nazi Anti-Semitism Shares Several Elements with Earlier Forms of Anti-Semitism1) Nazi Anti-Semitism shares several elements with earlier forms of Anti-Semitism.
What similarities do you find between the two, and what elements do you think are new to Nazi Anti-Semitism?
The term anti-Semitism refers to hatred towards Jews. It can take the form of religious or xenophobic anti-Semitism. The term itself was coined in 1870, but Anti-Semitic behaviour dates back to the time of Jesus, when Jews were regarded as the killers of Christ. The most obvious account of anti-Semitism occurred in WW2 and was carried out by the Nazi Party. But many of their anti-Semitic actions and proposals up until 1939, share similarities with the anti-Semitism which has evolved since the Middle Ages.

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Is Japanese Democracy Particularly Different from Australian Democracy? How Would You Explain the Difference and/or Similarities?

Is Japanese Democracy Particularly Different from Australian Democracy? How Would You Explain the Difference and/or Similarities? Although, the political structure of the democracy in Japan does indeed share some common aspect of the Australian democracy, there are particularly some aspects that distinguish the two from each other.

The first difference is that of the long-term electoral and political dominance of a single party. Due to having one party continuously in power, it can lead to corruption, where embedded interests linked to the ruling party moreover, it is difficult to critically examine its own policies or take major new change. This is contrasted with that of the Australian democracy having numerous parties to ensure competition and debates. It is also understandable that since there was a single party constantly in power, there may be corruption either in the electoral system is rigged or the opposition as a whole is dysfunctional. (Stockwin, 2011)

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Frying Chicken Analysis

 Frying Chicken Analysis Directions:

1.Heat the oil over medium heat in a deep fryer or in a wide, deep pan on stove.
2. In a large bowl, combine flour, salt, peppers, and paprika.
3. Break the eggs into a separate bowl and beat until blended.
4. Check the oil by dropping in a pinch of the flour mixture, If the oil bubbles rapidly around the flour, it's ready.
5. Dip each piece of chicken into the egg, then coat generously with the flour mixture.
6. Once the chicken is coated, it should be placed on a rack to allow the pieces to dry, which may take 20 to 30 minutes. Allowing the pieces to dry will provide for more even browning of the chicken.

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