1 In 4 Teen Girls Got Cervical Cancer Shot

1 In 4 Teen Girls Got Cervical Cancer ShotThis article from the Sun-Times newspaper addresses the amount of teenage girls, ages 13 to 17, who received the three series vaccination that attacks the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). The study is the first to track the rate of the Gardasil vaccine. Out of the 3,000 teens that were studied about twenty five percent got at least one Gardasil shot. The researchers were hoping for a much higher rate.
Along with studying how many received the vaccination for HPV, the study also took a look at other teen vaccination rates. These vaccinations included meningitis; one shot that guarded against diphtheria, whooping cough, and tetanus; varicella, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, and rubella (“1 in 4 teen girls,” 2008). All of these vaccinations had an increase in their rates. These shots were recommended to take at 11 years old and that is when the Gardasil vaccine was also recommended.

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Critical review


Critical reviewThis paper will discuss James J. Gross’ article “Emotion Regulation; Past, Present, Future”. In this article the author asserts that there are five theoretical challenges to emotion regulation investigations and offers insight on future directions in research. However before these five can be expanded and explored Gross attempts to define and re-define basic definitions. Furthermore, Gross gives the reader a brief overview of the history of research on emotions and the different approaches various models provide. After summarising Gross’ main points and ideas this paper will try to evaluate the importance of this article and its objectives.

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Explain the Importance of Reflective Practice in Continously Improving the Quality of Service Provided.

Explain the Importance of Reflective Practice in Continously Improving the Quality of Service Provided. Reflective practice is "the capacity to reflect on action so as to engage in a process of continuous learning", which, according to the originator of the term, is "one of the defining characteristics of professional practice". Reflective practice can be an important tool in practice-based professional learning settings where individuals learning from their own professional experiences, rather than from formal teaching or knowledge transfer, may be the most important source of personal professional development and improvement. As such the notion has achieved wide take-up, particularly in professional development for practitioners in the areas of education and healthcare. The question of how best to learn from experience has wider relevance however, to any organizational learning environment.Reflective practice and self-review plays an important role in many settings for some time, and is now crucial as Ofsted begins to look closely at how improvement is being promoted through providers’ self-evaluation. The self-evaluation will evidence how settings enable children to enjoy and achieve, stay safe and be healthy, but also how they provide opportunities for children to make a positive contribution and to develop skills for the future. Benefits of self-evaluation: helps clarify the aims and objectives, provides evidence of improvment, sets higher standards and provides quality control, helps to ensure the good use of resources, helps staff to see their work in a wider context, provides access to the views of other team members, children and their families, suggest areas to develop futher, highlights good practice that is worth disseminating and provides feedback on performance. Your setting’s self-evaluation may lead to a reassessment of staffing structures and the responsibilities of individual members. Supported by effective performance management, self-evaluation can build the skills and expertise of all staff, not least by identifying and sharing good practice.

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Explain the Importance of Reflective Practice in Continously Improving the Quality of Service Provided.

Explain the Importance of Reflective Practice in Continously Improving the Quality of Service Provided. Reflective practice is "the capacity to reflect on action so as to engage in a process of continuous learning", which, according to the originator of the term, is "one of the defining characteristics of professional practice". Reflective practice can be an important tool in practice-based professional learning settings where individuals learning from their own professional experiences, rather than from formal teaching or knowledge transfer, may be the most important source of personal professional development and improvement. As such the notion has achieved wide take-up, particularly in professional development for practitioners in the areas of education and healthcare. The question of how best to learn from experience has wider relevance however, to any organizational learning environment.Reflective practice and self-review plays an important role in many settings for some time, and is now crucial as Ofsted begins to look closely at how improvement is being promoted through providers’ self-evaluation. The self-evaluation will evidence how settings enable children to enjoy and achieve, stay safe and be healthy, but also how they provide opportunities for children to make a positive contribution and to develop skills for the future. Benefits of self-evaluation: helps clarify the aims and objectives, provides evidence of improvment, sets higher standards and provides quality control, helps to ensure the good use of resources, helps staff to see their work in a wider context, provides access to the views of other team members, children and their families, suggest areas to develop futher, highlights good practice that is worth disseminating and provides feedback on performance. Your setting’s self-evaluation may lead to a reassessment of staffing structures and the responsibilities of individual members. Supported by effective performance management, self-evaluation can build the skills and expertise of all staff, not least by identifying and sharing good practice.

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Observation Essay

Observation Essay
1.Dynamic systems theory (Adolph, Karasik, & Tamis-LeMonda, 2010; Thelen & Smith, 2006).
Infants assemble motor skills for perceiving and acting, which are coupled together. In order to develop motor skills, infants must perceive something in the environment that motivates them to act, then use their perceptions to fine-tune their movements. Motor skills thus present solution to the infant's goals. No matter what the kids do their behaviors reflect their aims. Such as kids are trying to climb to the high places to get the toys they want, kids are trying to touch the picture and point it to others, and they can stand and kick a ball without falling and stand and throw a ball. Both the gross motor skills (e.g. Moving their arms and walking) and fine motor skills (e.g. Grasping a toy, using a spoon, or anything that requires finger dexterity) can be seen during their movement.

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“It Starts In The Home!”

“It Starts In The Home!” In our community, teaching your children about sex is like cussing in church. The conversation about sex between parents and their teen children is frowned upon in most communities, because it breaks the “mold”. Parents should teach their teen children about sex and the affects of sex. If parents would educate their teen children about sex there would be a decrease in unwanted children/abortions, sexually transmitted diseases (Anderson 107-109), and some of the sexual assault case in our state (http://www.talkingwithkids.org/sex.html). Parent should educate their teen children in sex and stop allowing their peers, or the schools take all the responsibility for this part of their life.

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Critical review Essay

Critical review Essay
A critical review of James J. Gross, “Emotion Regulation: Past, Present, Future”. Cognition and Emotion, 1999, 13 (5), p.551-573.

This paper will discuss James J. Gross’ article “Emotion Regulation; Past, Present, Future”. In this article the author asserts that there are five theoretical challenges to emotion regulation investigations and offers insight on future directions in research. However before these five can be expanded and explored Gross attempts to define and re-define basic definitions. Furthermore, Gross gives the reader a brief overview of the history of research on emotions and the different approaches various models provide. After summarising Gross’ main points and ideas this paper will try to evaluate the importance of this article and its objectives.

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